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Tuesday, 11 August 2015 15:18

W&W Inno CXT Riser

When I took up archery my first riser was the Sebastian Flute Forged Plus and I still think this is one of the best risers for a beginner as it has all the features of a more advanced riser but at a fraction of the price and most importantly shoots very well. Having reached a stage where I'm looking to progress further in archery I decided that it was time to upgrade my riser.

It's no secret that the two biggest names in recurve bows are Hoyt and Win & Win and when you are looking at spending £300 - £500 on a riser there is very little to separate them with the largest decision factor being personal preference in how they feel and shoot to the individual.

Having fairly recently bought a new pair of Win & Win Rapido limbs and having previously shot a Sebastian Flute riser, which is made in the Win & Win factory, it made sense for me to buy a Win & Win riser and initially I started looking at the Winex riser. The Winex is certainly a very fine riser but I figured that if I was going to spend a few hundred pounds on a riser I may as well do it once and buy the best I could afford and so looked at the Inno range. As I didn't want an aluminum riser that ruled out the Inno AXT and Inno AL1 and so I opted to buy the Inno CXT.

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

W&W Rapido Limbs

When I started archery a couple of years ago I obviously wasn't going to spend a lot of money on my first set of limbs. In the end I bought long SF Premium limbs with a draw weight of 34lb. The SF Premium limbs are made from Maple wood with glass laminates and for a first set of limbs they are actually pretty good with a smoother draw than other 'starter' limbs of a similar price.

The SF Premium limbs have served me very well and with them I easily achieved 2nd Class classification in my first year and 1st Class classification in my second year. In terms of the distance I could achieve, with a draw length of just short of a 30" (I am pulling nearly 40lb on the fingers as measured with a bow scale) this allowed me to easily shoot at 60 yards but there was a noticeable and rapid drop off towards 80 yards. Whilst I never tried to shoot at 100 yards with these limbs I am certain that I would not have been able to reach this distance as my sight block was virtually at the bottom at 80 yards anyway.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 05 August 2014 00:00

Marley Conqueror Earphones

I've been a sound engineer working in film, TV and spoken word for nearly 25 years now and so it is fair to say that I am quite picky about sound quality as I've been trained to hear things that the average person may not and to make sure that sound is reproduced in the best way possible. Whilst MP3 may offer huge convenience in terms of portability, even relatively high bitrates still sound noticeably inferior to my ears. This is why I decided to rip my entire CD collection into iTunes using Apples lossless codec ALAC. However as I have a long commute everyday to work there then is the question of what do you listen to music on and what headphones/earphones to use?

Whilst I used to have an iPod the limitation of only being able to use to to listen to music means that I have now replaced this with an iPad and an iPhone. Perhaps not ideal platforms but a compromise is necessary if not to be weighed down by multiple devices. But what headphones to use?

Published in Blog
Monday, 30 June 2014 00:00

Huion H610 Graphics Tablet

Recently I've got more and more into colourising old black and white photos using Photoshop but have often found that using a mouse is quite cumbersome when it comes to making fine selections and 'painting' accurately. The obvious solution was to use a graphics tablet but which one? In the past, many years ago, I've owned two graphics tablets but never liked either of them. The first was a basic one, I think made my Trust but it was quite frankly rubbish and no better than using a mouse. This was partly due to the pen being very 'unpenlike' and unwieldy, partly due to the fact that the surface of the tablet was very shiny and so the pen just slipped over it and partly because it offered no varying levels of pressure, it was just on or off.

The second one I owned was a Wacom one. Now Wacom undoubtedly make some of the best graphic tablets going but they also cost a lot of money. Whilst this tablet was much better than the Trust one it was also tiny, so tiny that it was very hard to use accurately. With it being nearly 10 years since I last used a graphics tablet, how much had the technology come on and were Wacom still pretty much the old brand you should consider?

Published in Computers